Testing E-Liquids Vape Juice Results

Testing E-Liquids Vape Juice Results

Testing E-Liquids Vape Juice Results is an important ongoing activity responsible E-Liquid producers & manufacturers in the industry must insure. It is a responsibility that must be taken seriously which ensures products we market to the Canadian public are as safe as possible. This should be a shared principle among all Electronic Cigarette businesses and E-Liquid Manufacturers in Canada but, unfortunately, that is not yet the case. The rise of e-liquid & e-cigarette use in North America has caused many people to produce products in unsanitary environments using products which have the potential to cause illness. For this reason, we wish to fully disclose product testing practices so the public can be more confident in their ability to make informed decisions with the use of these products.

Testing E-Liquids Vape Juice Results

Members of the Electronic Cigarette Trade Association (ECTA) of Canada, such as Flavour Crafters are required to send a minimum of three (3) E-Liquid Samples of various flavors and nicotine concentrations for testing at least once every six months. As a manufacturer, we always send more than three as we believe that we are the first line of defense in (and in direct control of) making our E-Liquids as safe as possible based on what is known “today”.
The laboratory that we use for our testing is accredited by Health Canada, Enthalpy Labs, located in Durham, North Carolina (USA). This laboratory was chosen for several reasons. A few of which are:
• Accredited by Health Canada
• Work with AEMSA so they are familiar with our needs
• Work closely with Dr. Konstantinos Farsalinos, M.D. on E-Cigarette Research
• Perform specific Electronic Cigarette research and lab studies for researchers internationally.
Upon receipt of our test results we review each sample and take any actions that are needed. As a member of ECTA, our results are also forwarded to a third party for audit and historical purposes. The third party auditor reviews the results, deems pass or fail for each sample and follows-up on actions taken for any issues that may have been identified in the results.

Testing E-Liquids Vape Juice Results – Testing Procedures / Protocols
Since this is a relatively new industry, testing procedures and protocols are evolving and expected to change as we learn more going forward. Ultimately, as a Tobacco Harm Reduction tool, we want to make these products as safe as possible and it will take the cooperation of all who touch this industry, from the Flavoring Manufacturer to the E-Liquid Manufacturer to the Retailer to the Consumer. We all play a part in our success or failure.

Testing E-Liquids Vape Juice Results

Testing E-Liquids Vape Juice Results | Previous Tests:

* MDL – Minimum Detection Limit. The MDL will remain relatively constant but can vary slightly from test to test depending on the calibration of the equipment.
The MDL is specifically important when performing E-Liquid Testing. For example, in the case of Diacetyl… If you are not familiar with Diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione and/or 2,3-Butanedione they are basically compounds that contain certain ketones that have been linked, though the evidence is not conclusive, to the disease known as “Popcorn Lung”.
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has not set any “safe exposure limits” for inhalation of Diacetyl.
Because of this, ECTA has adapted a standard of non-detection for these elements. However, they have also adapted a temporary “pass” (with prescribed action) for a couple of lower detection levels for both Pentanedione and Diacetyl:
• Non-Detection of Pentanedione and Diacetyl is the ECTA standard to which all members must strive to achieve
• < 10 µg/ml no disclosure – This is a “caution” threshold, though while recommended, is not required for disclosure. Members are required to work towards removing the cause of the compound. Levels in this range are most often attributed to cross-contamination.
• < 100 µg/ml disclosure – This “caution” threshold requires disclosure to consumers if the eliquid remains on the market, and a plan to replace the flavorant with an alternative. Disclosure is required on a website (if applicable), in a Retail Location (if applicable), and optionally on the label of the product (pending stock level depletion) • > 100 µg/ml (ppm) indicates a “FAIL” – This is above the upper limit and beyond ECTA standards. If an E-Liquid result shows higher than this level the member must immediately stop sale of that product and either discontinue or return the product to their shelves only after the E-Liquid is reformulated and re-tested to show that it has been corrected.
Also, we position Electronic Cigarettes as a Tobacco Harm Reduction tool, so our goal should be to eliminate as many harmful aspects as possible. Tobacco Cigarettes contain Diacetyl in concentrations of 250+ ppm. Therefore, whatever testing protocol is used should be expected to test to well below that level. Unfortunately, some GC/MS test results that I have seen recently are only detecting to 0.1% (1000 ppm). That’s 4 times the level found in a single tobacco cigarette. So what would that test even prove?
If you are using GC/MS testing, be certain to check and understand the lower detection limit for what you are attempting to detect.
The testing protocol that we are using is what they call HPLC/UV Analysis. HPLC/UV testing has a very low minimum detection levels for Diacetyl and Pentanedione. For that reason, you can have confidence that we DO know “what is in the E-Liquid”. There is still more to learn and our testing protocols will be adjusted as needed.

NOTICE:

This Flavour has tested positive for Diacetyl at 16.7 µg/mL (ppm). While this is a very small trace amount of this compound, we are doing our part to ensure that our customers can make an informed decision.
If you are not familiar with Diacetyl (2,3-Butanedione), it has been “linked” (though without conclusive evidence) to a fatal disease known as “Popcorn Lung” (Bronchial Obliterans). And while in comparison, a single tobacco cigarette contains approximately 300 ppm of Diacetyl, no cases (or even remotely related cases) of Popcorn Lung have resulted from smoking tobacco cigarettes. So, is Diacetyl a concern? It can only be said that it is “a risk”.
Running the numbers for comparison. If you were to smoke 20 tobacco cigarettes per day, your daily exposure for Diacetyl would be around 6,000 ppm (300 ppm x 20 = 6000). If you use 3 mL of Vapour Liquid per day, your daily exposure limit for Diacetyl would be around 50 ppm (16.7 x 3 = 50.1).
At this time, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has not set any “safe exposure limits” for inhalation of Diacetyl, though it is permitted in food flavoring for the purposes of ingestion.
We believe this to be a result of one of our flavoring concentrates and we will be working to identify and replace that flavoring. Possibly a result of the Acetoin.